Sustainability in Coffee: Durham Living Wage Project

We were first introduced to the Durham Living Wage Project back in May during our 2015 Sustainable Spring event series. Our support team was asked to find businesses or organizations in their communities doing inspiring work in sustainability and invite them to speak at our training centers. Our team here in Durham invited Lindsay Moriarty and Rob Gillespie from Monuts Donuts to speak, and, I must admit, I was a little skeptical. I’d heard about Monuts long before moving to Durham—they’re a local favorite here—but I wondered what they would have to say aside from some tips on running a restaurant sustainably. Instead, I was awesomely surprised when Lindsay and Rob focused their presentation on the Durham Living Wage Project and introduced me to an aspect of social sustainability that I hadn’t previously considered. A living wage is the amount of income needed for one person to meet their basic needs without public or private assistance. The North Carolina minimum wage is $7.25/hour, for example, while the living wage for Durham, calculated by the city using a methodology tied to the federal poverty level, is $12.53/hour. To put it another way, that’s the difference between earning $15,000 a year and $25,000 a year.

The Durham Living Wage Project is a voluntary program that local businesses can join to certify that they pay all of their employees at least $12.53/hour. The minimum is $11.03/hour for employees with employer-provided health insurance or where employees are reimbursed for at least 50% of their cost of health insurance.

After spending many years on the front lines of the service industry in DC, I left Monuts’ presentation thinking, “That’s so cool! I wonder if most of my friends in the DC service industry get paid anything near the living wage for that region?” I was also feeling a bit guilty that I couldn’t leave the presentation and say, with any degree of certainty, that Counter Culture paid a living wage. As a company, we talk a lot about projects we support at origin and ways we’re working to reduce our environmental impact, but what if we weren’t even paying our own employees a living wage? To say that’s not sustainable is an understatement. To my relief, I looked into the certification more, found out that we do meet the Durham Living Wage Project’s requirements and joined the project. The whole process taught me two things about sustainability: Never stop digging into your company’s own practices, and always look to other businesses for new ideas. Without Monuts, I’m not sure if the Durham Living Wage Project would have appeared on my radar, and I’m grateful to them and other certified businesses in Durham for setting such a good example for us to follow. –Meredith