Sustainability in Coffee: Operations

In this post, I’m going to shift away from talking about sustainability where we buy coffee and focus on our own operations as a roaster.

A coffee grown sustainably shouldn’t necessarily retain that “sustainable” designation if others involved further along the supply chain aren’t also acting responsibly. Just as poor roasting can ruin a high-quality green coffee, an unsustainable roasting company can compromise the integrity of a coffee that was grown and processed sustainably. In other words, Counter Culture has a responsibility not only to roast coffee well, but also to uphold the sustainability of the coffees we buy.

Beyond sourcing sustainably grown coffee, I see Counter Culture as having three major responsibilities in continuing this momentum: environmental protection, supporting community viability, and communicating information to consumers.

Thanks in part to the personal interests of Counter Culture co-founder Fred Houk—who was a passionate bird-watcher—we’ve always had environmental stewardship in our DNA, though sometimes it’s expression has been informal. We took a big step forward in creating systems to formalize our environmental sustainability commitments when we started measuring and offsetting our carbon footprint in 2011. The offset part has been especially cool in that it has allowed us to do some really interesting projects in the communities where we purchase coffee.

It’s taken a few years to perfect the measuring process; we’re now to the point where part of my new job will be not only to measure our footprint, but to work on reducing it and reporting our results. We’re also creating systems to track our waste and water usage with an eye on making sure we’re using resources as efficiently as possible.

As I mentioned in the first post, a full picture of sustainability encompasses not just environmental concerns, but social issues as well. Much like our environmental efforts up to this point, our social efforts have been largely focused on programs at “origin,” i.e. in communities where coffee is grown—like SEEDS and collaborations with non-profits working in coffee communities.

We’ll continue to work on social sustainability at origin, but we also want to strengthen our efforts in local communities. With a growing number of training centers in the U.S., it’s important to us to support customers and organizations working on projects that contribute to viable livelihoods in those communities. We also have some pretty amazing employees at those training centers who are interested in sustainability and whose efforts we support through our Green Fund, which offers $500 in matching funds annually for personal sustainability-related projects.

Frankly, none of these efforts can achieve their full impact if we don’t do a good job at communicating them. Our unique position in the coffee supply chain means that it’s our job to tell you not only what we’re doing, but also what farmers are working on and what customers can to do to consume our coffee sustainably. That’s a lot of information, and, over the years, we’ve tried presenting it many different ways. This presentation is something we’ll always be working to improve, and I see it as one of the most exciting challenges of my new position.

As a corollary to this glimpse of where we’re at, the next post will talk about where we’ve had successes and failures at moving coffees along the sustainability continuum.

–Meredith Taylor