Sustainability in Coffee: The Pollinator Project

As I’ve said in previous posts, we have some awesome employees here at Counter Culture who think about sustainability not only at work, but in their own lives, as well. One of these sustainably-minded folks is Chelsea Thoumsin at our Philadelphia Durham Training Center. Chelsea knows more about bees than anyone I’ve ever met and, given that we depend on flowering plants for coffee, I asked her to write about her work with the Pollinator Project and shed some light on the importance of pollinators. –Meredith Taylor “I keep hearing in the news that the bees are dying. Why’s that? And what can I do to help?” As a beekeeper, I am on the receiving end of these and many other insect-related questions. These two, in particular, essentially spurred the creation of the Pollinator Project—wildflower seed packets designed to help honeybees and other integral pollinators. Just how dire is the honeybee situation, anyway? In Pennsylvania alone, beekeepers experienced an average of 60% of honeybee colony loss in the April of 2014–April 2015 season, and, according to Science Daily, the national average of recorded losses was more than 40%. These numbers are staggering, but also considered “normal” over the past decade or so. Extreme losses indicate a larger, more convoluted issue of honeybee health and survival. These are just a few of the factors of what can cause a colony to die: pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, starvation (due to lack of a variety of nectar and pollen-producing plants), stress of environmental change, agricultural stress (including migratory beekeeping), prematurely failing queen bees, varroa mites, disease (such as American/European foulbrood), tracheal mites, nosema, wax moths, and small hive beetles.

But why do we need pollinators? Pollinators facilitate plant reproduction, and, without them, we wouldn’t have more than 85% of both food and plant resources in the world. Honeybees alone are responsible for about 30% of our food resources. Coffee trees are self-pollinating, but studies have shown a 15-50% increase in production when honeybees are aiding that pollination. To state it another way, the loss of pollinating bees would result in about a 33% reduction in coffee production.

Supporting the survival of honeybees is relatively simple for the average citizen: plant pollinator-friendly flowers. That alone provides a more habitable environment for honeybees, bumblebees, hundreds of species of native bees, butterflies, moths, beetles, wasps and hornets (yes, they’re important, too), and hummingbirds. Lack of food, aka “forage” to us bee folk, is one of the main contributors of the honeybee’s decline, not to mention the vast reduction in populations of other effective and very necessary pollinators we often forget about. While the idea of sprinkling wildflower seeds to make the world a happier and better place for honeybees seems like a Lisa-Frankean pipe dream, it truly does make a difference in the ecosystem at large. Wildflowers are hearty, they provide habitat for insects and birds, they re-seed easily, and they take minimal resources to maintain and propagate. Pollinator Project seed varieties are selected with the intention of providing forage during all seasons possible. Since April of 2015, when Pollinator Project came to fruition, enough wildflower seeds have been purchased (and presumably, planted) to cover more than 3 full acres—that’s more than 130,000 square feet of land—in solid wildflower mass. This certainly isn’t nothing, and the repercussions are great since these wildflowers re-seed and exponentially increase their numbers each season. Another mission of Pollinator Project is to focus on education with the goal of demystifying the role of pollinators—and how we can better support them for their (and our) future. I’ve hosted presentations for groups ranging from high school students to residents of a boutique hotel, but one common theme rings true: It’s inspiring to experience others wanting to make a positive change—for pollinators or otherwise—and I am thankful that Pollinator Project can do just that. –Chelsea Thoumsin Pollinator Project is a small business in Philadelphia that fills up much of Chelsea’s free time. Twenty percent of proceeds go The Xerces Society.