Sustainability in Coffee: Transparency

In the last post, I talked about why I think reporting is so important and what we have planned for the future of our own reporting. As I dived into planning for the upcoming 2014 Transparency Report with our coffee and marketing teams this week, I was asked a really important question by both teams, “What are we trying to convey with this report?” It’s a fair question and one that I think merits some consideration. I came across an article from a sustainable business news site this week titled something like, “Would You Want to Read Your Company’s Sustainability Report?” Again, a fair question and a good call out against the multi-page, text-heavy reports that no one—including people who work for the company—usually reads. So why is transparency important to us at Counter Culture? And how do I create a report that conveys the answers to that question in a clear and engaging way? For me, the first and most important step is to consider the audience. I’m not compiling a transparency report so that sustainability managers at other companies can look at and be impressed; my primary audience is our wholesale customers and coffee consumers who want to know more about our coffee.

Why transparency? If I had to pick a one-word answer, I would say authenticity. We work hard to build relationships in our supply chain, not only because they help secure our supply, increase our quality, and improve our sustainability, but also because they facilitate an information flow among participants throughout the buying process that’s far from the norm.

If we know a lot of information about our coffees, why not pass that on to our consumers? I won’t pretend that a few transparency reports are going to cause a huge shift in consumer demand, but I think we owe it to our consumers to give them as much information as possible and to put that information into context so that they can make more-informed decisions about buying coffee. If we want to improve the sustainability of coffee supply chains in general, sharing information—both with other companies and with consumers—is a crucial step to get everyone on the same page. Presenting this information in a format that’s engaging and, therefore, actually gets read is definitely challenging. We experimented with new format for our 2013 Transparency Report, but I think we still have room to evolve, especially as the amount of information we share increases. It’s good to share information, but, especially for a product with a somewhat mystifying supply chain like coffee, I think that information has to be presented in a way that  actually makes it useful to consumers. I really like the visual approach of this transparency report from 49th Parallel, a coffee roaster in Vancouver. Consider this an inspiration for what’s to come! As I dig into the work required to deliver what I’ve been talking about with our carbon and transparency reports over the next few weeks, I’m going to take a short break from these regular blog posts so I can return with some awesome material. Talk to you soon! –Meredith Taylor