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The Andes

Colombia and Peru

$19.00 | 12 oz box

The Andes mountain range dominates the South American landscape as it stretches over 5,500 miles and includes the Western hemisphere's highest peaks. These mountains define many coffee-growing regions in Colombia and Peru with their high altitudes, diverse microclimates, and rich soils—not to mention challenging logistics for travel and communication. This blend combines some of our favorite lots from these remote, mountainous areas to create a delicious, full-bodied coffee with notes of red apple, raisin, and simple syrup.

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QUANTITY

Tasting Notes

Red Apple
Raisin
Simple Syrup

Roast Level

?
DARK 0 25 50 75 LIGHT 100 74

Process

Natural Sundried
Natural Sundried
Washed
Washed
Pulp Natural
Pulp Natural
Experimental
Experimental

Notes

Varieties: Bourbon, Typica, Caturra, Castillo, Colombia
Elevation: 1,600–2,400 meters
Availability: Through April 15th

Story

A lot goes into making high-quality specialty coffee. The environment a coffee is grown in, the botanical variety of the coffee tree, processing practices, and whether or not quality is maintained all the way from the farm to our roastery all culminate in the final cup. The goal of The Andes is to recognize that, while each of these aspects plays a role, the physical environment—from the weather cycles in the region to the extreme geographical terrain—unites these coffees and tells a unique story about how coffee grows and how producers live in these mountainous regions.

The high elevations and steep terrain of these growing regions impact several areas of coffee production, notably temperature and sun exposure. As coffee is grown farther up the valley walls, the temperature range that coffee trees experience tend to be wider and colder. The winding and steep-walled mountain ranges cast shadows on the coffee trees, limiting the amount of direct sunlight that they receive day to day. These shorter growing days and cooler temperatures in these regions mean that the coffee beans grow more slowly—creating denser, harder beans with highly-concentrated sugars. The resulting flavor of these beans is often characterized by more perceived brightness (or "acidity"), as well.

The sporadic weather patterns which limit or inconsistently bring precipitation, can greatly impact coffee growing in these regions. Rains are an essential part of triggering coffee trees to flower, which is the first stage of producing its fruit, the coffee cherry. If rains are delayed or limited during cherry development, then the beans can mature later in the season and at inconsistent rates, even on the same branch, or in some extreme cases, not at all. This makes picking only ripe coffee cherries extremely difficult. The irregularity of rain which is common in the later stages of the harvest cycle in this region, create another challenge when drying already picked coffee.