You are here

Hi all,
 
A group of coffee producers in Oaxaca City, Mexico, in the midst of a coffee tasting. Photo by Clemente Santiago.
Earlier this week, I had the unusual opportunity to speak, via Skype video, to a group of budding coffee cuppers in Oaxaca City, Mexico. Gathered around a conference table at the offices of Sustainable Harvest – one of our importer partners – were representatives of the 21st de Septiembre cooperative, the Union of Oaxacan Organic Coffee Producers and Processors (UNOPCAFE) dry mill, and another Oaxacan cooperative named Un Sueño de Tantos. (Un Sueño de Tantos translates as A Dream of Many, which is a fantastic name for a cooperative, if you ask me.) These farmers journeyed to Oaxaca City from around the region to participate in a cupping training, and, after we had all made our introductions and waved at our respective cameras, Clemente Santiago of Sustainable Harvest asked if I would speak to the group about what cupping means to us at Counter Culture Coffee.
 
Ruperto and Ulises of the 21st with green coffee classification instructions. Photo by Clemente Santiago.
I jumped at the chance, of course. I explained that we cup coffee every day. We cup every coffee that we purchase multiple times before we make the decision to purchase it. We cup with coffee growers, and we cup with coffee consumers so that we all learn to taste coffee the same way. As farmers and cuppers, they have the unique ability to connect the flavors of their coffee that result from their work in growing, harvesting, and processing coffees: any trained cupper can recognize the flavors that result from on-farm problems like picking under-ripe cherries, over-fermentation, and improper drying, but without the farmer, none of us can affect the changes necessary to fix such problems. Cupping skills will also empower them in negotiation, as they will have the language of taste in common with the buyers of their coffee.
 
Romualdo of the 21st learning how to roast on Sustainable Harvest's sample roaster. Photo by Clemente Santiago.
 
In some ways, I was preaching to the choir – all of these folks had already made the decision to come to the week-long training. That said, the heads nodding around the table as I spoke reminded me that we can't emphasize cupping too much! The 21st has talked about cupping, a prerequisite for microlot selection, for the past two years, but other projects have taken precedence. I am so happy and proud that they've taken that commitment a step further this year!
 
Gracias,
Kim Elena
Recent Updates:
We're looking for people to join our field operatives street team in North Carolina: share your passion for coffee and to help to promote Counter Culture to grocery shoppers around the state! Prospective team members should possess a strong enthusiasm for customer service—and a desire to learn...
In this post, I'd like to dive in to what I mentioned in the first post as a good indicator of a coffee's sustainability: certifications. Wouldn't it be great if there were a certification and corresponding label that could simply tell us whether a coffee is sustainable or not? The good news is...
Welcome to the first in a series of posts about what sustainability means in the context of coffee. Over the next few weeks, we'll explore questions like, "How does Counter Culture know that a coffee is sustainable?" and "What does a sustainable roasting operation look like?" As a recent...
Please join us Saturday, April 25, 10 a.m.–2 p.m., to celebrate the opening of our Bay Area Roastery + Training Center in Emeryville, CA—featuring brewing workshops, limited-edition giveaways, and more. Bay Area Roastery + Training Center 1329 64th St Emeryville, CA 94608...
Click here to see this photo set on Flickr. Our annual Origin Field lab trip is an opportunity for  Counter Culture wholesale customers to learn about coffee cultivation in an immersive environment. We host this lab, in part, because we recognize that the dedicated professionals...