You are here

Roberto Salazar walking the farm at Finca Pashapa in Ocotepeque, Honduras. Photo by Kim Elena Bullock.
The journey continues! After crossing the border between Esquipulas, Guatemala, and Nueva Ocotepeque, Honduras, in a taxi that reeked of gasoline fumes and broke down twice (even the dull moments aren't entirely dull on these trips), Tim and I met up with Roberto Salazar, the man driving the success of the incomparable Finca Pashapa. Counter Culture's relationship with Finca Pashapa is one of our oldest—going on seven years!—and, as we drove to the farm, we reminisced with Roberto about how much both of our operations have grown and changed in the intervening years. Once known as Organic French Roast, we now recognize the Salazar family's coffee as Finca Pashapa, and we've never felt better about the always-sweet, silky-bodied, and balanced coffee the farm produces.
 
If you remember nothing else about Roberto from Finca Pashapa trip reports and coffee biographies, you probably remember that this farm has the most impressive worm composting system I have ever seen, and, in fact, that system is a major contributing factor to Pashapa's economic sustainability as well as environmental sustainability because it helps them to make all of the compost that their farm requires. All of it! That's amazing!
 
Finca Pashapa demonstrates that it is possible to manufacture all of the necessary fertilizers on the farm using materials found on the farm. Roberto Salazar's extensive worm cultures contribute tremendously to this end. Photo by Kim Elena Bullock.
I find this so inspiring because organic agriculture requires, of course, that growers comply with rules about what kind of inputs (like fertilizers and herbicides) they can apply to their plants but also stipulates monitoring the health of the soil that they cultivate. Healthy soil (as well as healthy coffee plants) requires a mixture of nutrients and providing those nutrients organically tends to be more expensive for growers than applying synthetic fertilizers. Those higher costs are a major challenge for many certified organic farms as well as an obstacle for many sustainably-minded small farms considering certification.
 
When a farm like Finca Pashapa demonstrates that it is possible to manufacture all of the necessary fertilizers on the farm using materials found on the farm, my heart soars and I feel a renewed commitment to supporting our certified organic grower partners and further promoting organic agriculture with those partners not yet certified. Did I mention that Finca Pashapa also have some of the highest and most stable yields of coffee per hectare of any organic farm I have seen, anywhere? Double-amazing!
 
Roberto Salazar and Kim Elena examine drying coffee beans at Finca Pashapa. Photo by Tim Hill.
Finca Pashapa might seem too good to be true except that they came to this holistic approach and integrated farming system by way of multiple generations of chemical-fertilizer, conventional coffee farming. According to Roberto, the family's quest to become the model organic farmers they are today began little over a decade ago when they recognized that in milling coffee at their house without regard for the water and waste created in the process, they had become the biggest polluters in their town. The impact of their actions dawned on them, and they started looking for opportunities to improve, and there's something in the Salazar blood that drives them to grab hold of an idea and not let go until they've figured it out.
 
Their approach to quality began the same way, with a cupping class that initially made Roberto laugh before he tried it (Slurping? Spitting? Is this for real?), but he enjoyed it and decided that he wanted to be good at it. Since that first day 8 years ago, he has gone on to serve as a judge in Cup of Excellence competitions in Honduras, worked on establishing and promoting the variety of flavor profiles of Honduras's diverse-but-generally-undifferentiated coffee regions, and forged the first farmer-run lot-separation program with the co-operative that he works with in La Labor.
 
Tim and I had the chance to cup the year's first offerings from this per-producer lot-separation program, and we were thrilled by what we found. We have a treat in store for you all this year! And what is said treat? Well, dear readers, I plan to leave you in suspense knowing that Tim, Roasting Manager and head of Counter Culture Coffee quality control, will surely weigh in on the cupping results and what's in store for all of us. Stay tuned!
 
abrazos,
Kim Elena
 
Recent Updates:
We celebrated the opening of our new Charleston, SC Training Center last weekend. The open house event featured brewing workshops, custom limited-edition giveaways designed by Fuzzco, whole-hog barbecue from The Pig Whistle (Chapel Hill, NC), gelato from Beardcat's Sweet Shop, and more. Thanks...
In the last post, I talked about why I think reporting is so important and what we have planned for the future of our own reporting. As I dived into planning for the upcoming 2014 Transparency Report with our coffee and marketing teams this week, I was asked a really important question by both...
A few weeks ago, I read an article about the purported end of the farm-to-table movement in the restaurant industry. According to the author, farm-to-table has been taken too far and restaurant-goers want to go back to ordering off of a menu without being “berated” by an extensive explanation of...
Expanding on the theme from my last post, I'd like to keep exploring the movement away from thinking about sustainability in coffee as a checklist of certifications and more as a process of movement along a continuum of continuous improvement. One aspect that's really appealing about the...
Over the duration of this series, I've talked a lot about "moving along the continuum" or "moving along the spectrum" in reference to how we think about sustainability. I'd like to dive into this idea a little deeper, because it applies to how we think about a lot of things Counter Culture—not just...