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Coffee cherries ripening on a shrub in Santa Ana, El Salvador. Photo by Tim Hill.
You might think that the car picking me up from San Salvador breaking down less than 2 miles from the airport would be bad sign of things to come on this trip, but I knew that I was going to see Aida Batlle and Finca Mauritania so that was going to be impossible. After a quick 2 hour drive, well, and a little bit of waiting for alternate transportation, I arrived at Las Cruces – the mill where our Los Luchadores coffee comes from. Immediately upon arriving at Las Cruces, something caught my eye. Kenya drying beds. What? There is only one person that could have been responsible for this. And come to think of it, I believe the very first conversation that Peter had with Aida – over 5 years ago now – was actually about Kenya drying beds for coffee. It turns out Aida had them built to do some experiments with drying coffee and coffee pulp for the now very popular Cascara. But I will talk about that later.
 
Aida Batlle stands at one of her raised, Kenya-style drying bed in Santa Ana, El Salvador. Photo by Tim Hill.
Aida met me at Las Cruces, and we quickly caught up and talked about the coffee world and El Salvador politics. (If you haven't seen the papers, El Salvador had a presidential election right after I left, and it was in the minds of everyone when I was down there.) We also, of course, talked about her coffees and some of the exciting things she is working on. After a quick walk around the mill it was off to dinner, then bed so we could get a jump on the next day, when we would visit Aida's farms.
 
In 2007 I visited Finca Mauritania while Aida was in her third year of transitioning to organic production and, while everything looked really good, it didn't look like it does now. Everything now seems just a little bit lusher, a little bit greener, a little bit more shaded, and just a little bit happier. It was a great thing to see, and Aida talked about how the transition to organic was very hard but that was just the beginning. Now, the challenge is to make it really work and to breathe new life into everything through the many things she continues to learn.
 
After visiting Finca Mauritania, it was a quick little drive up the side of Santa Ana volcano to visit Finca Kilimanjaro. From first glance, it was apparent that Aida had been very busy. Finca Kilimanjaro also looked better, as well, much better. Aida said that Kilimanjaro and Los Alpes (another one of her farms) had been even more challenging than Mauritania because of the higher altitude, and that there is still a long way to go, but overall she was excited by the progress. Oh, and as a huge, awesome side note: this year Counter Culture is going to be able to purchase coffee from Finca Kilimanjaro!!! If you remember it from 2 years ago, I am sure your mouth is watering already.
 
Coffee cherries drying on a raised bed in Santa Ana, El Salvador. Photo by Tim Hill.With the all the excitement over the farms and the great things Aida has been working on, I almost forgot to ask about Pasa and Pulp Natural. Before I left for El Salvador, Peter warned me that 2 weeks prior there had been some unseasonable rains that could potentially make Pasa not happen this year. And, sadly that was true. Just like tomatoes, if rain comes at the wrong time, the fruit can split, and if you leave it on the tree (like Aida does for Pasa) the fruit can rot. However, being super-creative, Aida decided that while Pasa wasn't going to be possible, she could do a Sundried Natural more akin to the process in Ethiopia … so, this year, we will have Pulp Natural processed coffee and a natural sundried Finca Mauritania. After seeing and talking about all those coffees, I couldn't wait for the next day when I would actually get to taste them.
 
So, onward to the tasting. At Las Cruces the next day, the Sundried Natural Finca Mauritania was absolutely delicious – full of creamy fruit and chocolate which I don't think anyone will be disappointed in. I tasted this year's Pulp Natural, as well – and I see espresso in its future. I also got to taste this years washed Finca Mauritania and Finca Kilimanjaro, which were both mind-blowing. And, to my surprise I also got to taste some of this years Cascara. For those of you that didn't get to try it this past year, Aida took the skin from the coffee cherry and dried it out to make a tea. This has been done traditionally in Yemen and Kenya but never have I heard of in El Salvador. The best part about it is that because of Aida's exemplary picking of the coffee to begin with, the tea is so much sweeter and juicier than any of versions I have tasted in the past. This year in particular, she has improved the process, and we are expecting some great Cascara.
 
This year's Los Luchadores will come from Finca Las Delicias, a farm in Santa Ana, El Salvador. Photo by Tim Hill.If all that weren't enough, after the Cascara, it was time to taste this year's Los Luchadores. The last two years, we have bought our Los Luchadores Pacamara from a farm in Metapán, El Salvador, called Finca Buenos Aires. This year that particular farm wanted to submit their Pacamara into the Cup of Excellence, and while we were disappointed that we couldn't buy it for Los Luchadores we wish them luck in the competition. Anyway, from the cupping table of Pacamara coffees one stood out immediately. The coffee was floral, full of deep, dark plum, black cherry, prune, savory tomato, with a crisp brightness, and in the end turned out to have that signature syrupy body. After cupping, Aida asked which one I liked best, and I said without hesitation, “Finca Las Delicias.” To which she said “Oh! Perfect that is where we are going right now." I love instant gratification!! So, off we went. We started driving to Finca Las Delicias and I couldn't quite put my finger on it but everything seemed very familiar. It was driving me crazy and then Aida said, “This side of the volcano is really different.” So long story short and oddly enough, Finca Las Delicias is on the Santa Ana volcano … just on the other side than Finca Mauritania. I guess there is something about the microclimates around the volcano.
A beautiful view of volcanic terrain in Santa Ana, El Salvador. Photo by Tim Hill.
When we arrived at the farm – after some rough roads that had clearly been affected by the eruption 2 years ago – I couldn't believe the view from the farm.
 
The farm was great, I got to see the section where most of the Pacamara is planted and a lot of pre-mill cherry sorting. I can say is it was really all awe-inspiring, and I can't wait for the next lot of Los Luchadores. Wow, what a day. What a four days!
 
Next: I was off to Guatemala to meet up with Kim Elena and onto Finca Pashapa.
 
-Tim
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