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Members of the La Voz que Clama en el Desierto co-op in Guatemala learning aout.
We received news a few weeks back from La Voz que Clama en el Desierto, the cooperative in Guatemala from which we purchase coffee that brings delicious flavors to Farmhouse part of the year. The cooperative manager, Andres, wrote to let us know that they started their project with Seeds funding in earnest. As a quick reminder, they were one of two projects selected for this funding cycle,, and their goal was to offer training to coffee producers on how to prevent and combat leaf rust with organic methods.
 
So, far they have contracted the appropriate agronomist to lead the trainings, and they have already held eight days of workshops with the producers. The topics included at the workshops have covered methods for effective pruning and renovation of coffee plants. They have also started discussing fertilizers and effective treatments to protect plants from leaf rust.
 
In the coming months, they will continue the series and touch on more specific application of the techniques, as well as a broader discussion of how to strengthen the cooperative associations as a whole through these types of efforts.
 
Coffee from La Voz arrived and will be available as Farmhouse starting Tuesday.
 
Thanks,
Hannah
 
POSTED IN: sustainability
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