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As individuals, businesses, and policymakers begin to understand the impact of CO2 and the actions needed to counteract the effects of climate change, we see terms like carbon footprint and carbon neutral gain popularity. We also see that there are different ways to achieve carbon neutrality, e.g. reducing energy use, paying for renewable energy credits to replace the energy that we use from the conventional power grid, and planting trees to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere. Our path toward carbon neutrality begins by reducing our use of energy in all areas of our business, from the propane that we use to roast our coffee to the gasoline in our cars to the electricity that powers our computers and phones. In those areas where we cannot reduce our consumption of energy, we will look for alternative sources of energy. Our goal is to get as close to zero as possible, and then to purchase carbon offsets to account for the CO2 that we have not been able to eliminate from our products and processes. The more we reduce, the less we have to offset, which is good from both a fiscal-sustainability perspective and an environmental-sustainability perspective, as we humans can plant a finite number of trees.

Most people accept that the earth’s climate is changing as a result of human activities, in large part through the carbon dioxide released by the burning of fossil fuels.As we began to investigate our activities, we quickly realized that our footprint does not begin or end with Counter Culture Coffee’s activities. We value the interconnectedness of our coffee supply chains, from producers to consumers, and we work hard to communicate that we are all responsible to one another. If everything we do impacts everyone in the supply chain, how can Counter Culture Coffee be responsible only for the emissions of roasting coffee and for our staff’s energy use? What about the electricity our customers use to heat water for brewing in their shops? What about the fuel used to ship coffee from farms around the world to our doorstep? And what is the impact on the farm level?

Our coffee-producer partners live in some of the most ecologically important places in the world, and the biological diversity of their healthy farms assists in mitigating climate change. No other alternative crop—from corn to cattle—coexists in such a harmonious relationship with a diverse natural environment as coffee. Unfortunately, these beautiful and important places are also some of the places most threatened by the effects of climate change: rising temperatures, inconsistent rain patterns jeopardize the ability of these small farmers to make a living on coffee farms. It’s staggering to consider that our choices as a company here in the United States impact the very people on whom we depend for the product that makes our business possible. Scary as that might sound, the good news is that through these partnerships, we also have the ability to effect change ourselves and demonstrate the value of our beliefs and activities.

Seed to Cup Pilot Project

Aida Batlle is recognized throughout the coffee world as a pioneer in great coffee flavor development, and her coffee is sought after by roasters all over the world. Photo by Counter Culture Coffee.Leveraging our supply chain, we recently initiated a pilot project with a producer partner, Aida Batlle of Finca Mauritania in Santa Ana, El Salvador, and a customer, Peregrine Espresso in Washington, DC, to measure the carbon footprint of Finca Mauritania’s coffee from seed to cup. We are calculating the energy used at each step in the process, converting it to pounds of CO2 released into the atmosphere, and then planting trees with Aida in El Salvador to sequester the equivalent amount of carbon to what we produce in the processing, transportation, roasting, shipping, and brewing of her farm’s coffee. The tree planting initiative is directly funded by proceeds from the sale of Finca Mauritania coffee at Peregrine Espresso, so the program will plant a number of trees in proportion to the amount of coffee produced and consumed in this specific supply chain between farm, roaster, and café.

Click here for a press release about the pilot program.
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