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This was my third trip to the Yungas region outside of the larger town, Caranavi, in Bolivia. Maybe it's because it was the first trip I ever took with Counter Culture or maybe because Bolivia is unique no matter how you look at it, this country, its struggles and successes, and its people continue to captivate.

This year, I visited with our long-standing partners from the Cenaproc cooperative who bring us the coffee we know as Nueva Llusta. Last year, there were some outstanding single-producer lots—Justina Ramos, Luis Huayhua, Pedro Quispe, Dionicio Quispe, and Irene Gomez, among them. I wanted to check on the forward motion of this single-producer project, as well as the group as a whole. I also visited with our exporting partner, Maria Ndia, and scouted new relationships through another exporter.

This year is a rough one in Bolivia—weather patterns have led to heavier and more prolonged rain than expected. This in turn has led to a later harvest and lower volumes. Even though the volume would have been lower this year anyway, an almost 40% decrease was not projected. Lower down the mountain, rust has started to become an issue. Higher up the mountain, frozen coffee beans.

However—when coffee is your business, on the producer end and on the roaster end—we find places of hope and we make plans. Over a decade of working with Cenaproc has us well-positioned to support each other in challenging years and lift up how delicious we know coffee from their region to be. We will likely see coffee from Bolivia starting in January or February this year—welcoming back old friends and potentially adding a few new ones to the line up.

Muchos Saludos!
Hannah Popish
POSTED IN: coffee, origin reports
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