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EQ!Theme

Deconstructing the blend – Part 1 of 2

In years past, we have worked hard to transition many of our "blends" to become flavor profiles that can then be best served by one single-origin coffee, two if push comes to shove. Our rationale has been twofold: one, make transparency easier—there's no hiding the coffee when it's the only single-origin—and two, by necessity, intentionally trying to move through coffee within a timely fashion to maintain freshness. But, we know that combining coffees together for flavor purposes is not inherently a bad thing.

On Monday, we will be introducing a new type of blend. The debut incarnation is called Equilibrium! The underlying idea here is that we don't really think of it as a blend, at all. Rather, Equilibrium is three of the most delicious coffees available to us in summer and early fall, and they somehow become even more delicious, bright, and complex when combined together.

Style of Tasting: Cup the Components

This week, as a precursor to the arrival of Equilibrium, we will taste each of the parts that make up the whole. We'll suggest cupping the three side by side to showcase what each brings to the table. You may then decide to brew or do whatever else you like with the crowd favorite.

While tasting, encourage people to think about what the three coffees might taste like together. As a teaser, let them know if they come back to the tasting next week, we'll delve more into the philosophy and future of coffees like Equilibrium.

Notes on the Coffees:

As a nod to its name, Equilibrium is made up of equal parts of three coffees that are already known to us, the first two, Idido and Concepción Huista, more so than the third, Ngunguru, which, of course, just graced our roasters for the first time this past week.

33% Idido, Yirgacheffe, Ethiopia
This first lot from the Idido cooperative in Yirgacheffe, Ethiopia, represents a select group of 200 of the most dedicated farmers. These farmers turn in their best cherry at the peak of harvest for this washed special preparation coffee. Notes of melon, orange blossom, and citrus.

33% Concepción Huista, Huehuetenango, Guatemala
One of the most highly anticipated Central American coffees we offer, Concepción Huista delivers yet again. This year, our fourth year working with the cooperative, we continued to focus on buying smaller lots in addition to volume—trying to capture higher quality from particular areas within the cooperative. Look for softer flavors of creamy caramel and sweet plum.

33% Ngunguru, Nyeri, Kenya
Ngunguru is one of three members of the Tekangu cooperative society. When we went looking for great Nyeri coffee this year, we knew we had to share Ngunguru's coffee with you. Lush, complex notes of raisin and sweet savoriness abound.

Availability:

Equilibrium will be available with all of its brightness and juiciness on Friday, July 18. We anticipate it will stick around through September or October, but it's a new item so why not try it at its debut in case it disappears quickly!

 

 

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