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They ain’t what they Llusta be

These coffees should taste familiar, but pay attention! Take notes! Today’s tasting is the last hurrah for Toscano as portrayed by Nueva Llusta from Bolivia and Haru in the role of Apollo. Just Wednesday we began roasting and selling new versions of these well-loved coffees: the Toscano shipping now is comprised of a just-arrived lot from Union El Triunfo in Chiapas, Mexico and Apollo of Suke Quto from Sidamo, Ethiopia.

Notes on the Coffees

I get excited about new iterations of products like Toscano and Apollo because change typically means fresher components (not to mention that I love adventure of all sorts, including of flavor). In Toscano’s case, though, I will admit to feeling a twinge of wistfulness today because Toscano (NL) has been so loved and appreciated in this current form, which is especially interesting given how bright it is and how seldom we think of Toscano for brightness. That said, we bought Union El Triunfo’s coffee last year thinking it would taste good in Toscano and it did, and I’m glad to have it back this year for Toscano. This is one of the strongest co-ops in Chiapas from social and environmental perspectives, and they have great cup quality potential, too.

Haru has held steady in its role as Apollo for many months and if we had more of it to sell, I’d feel comfortable continuing to do so, given how well it and Idido have held up. Alas, we finally reached the end of last year’s Haru and this year’s lots are somewhere between Yirgacheffe and Durham, so we went looking for alternatives and found Suke Quto. Suke Quto is a delicious organic coffee from Sidamo, Ethiopia that shipped early, and that is pretty much all we know about it. We are eagerly awaiting our coffees from our long-time supplier co-ops within the YCFCU but meanwhile, Apollo’s citrusy, floral flavor profile makes it hard to substitute coffees from other parts of the world.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see the same (but are they the same?) coffees on the table next week or the one to follow, so as I said, take notes!

Rollout Dates and Availability

These lots rolled over Wednesday, April 16, and we should be working our way through them over the next month to two months.
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