You are here

Theme

Late Harvest on the Other Side of the World

Today we taste coffees from the Colbran family’s estate, Baroida, and from the Tairora Project that represents smaller-scale coffee farms around the estate in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

Notes on the Coffees

Baroida and Tairora aren’t new to any of you, many of whom have come to not only love but really appreciate this coffee’s tangy, spicy and savory qualities during the months when we are waiting for coffees from the northern hemisphere to arrive. We split our shipment from the Colbrans this year, which is why we are able to draw a distinction between “early harvest” and “late harvest”. Splitting lots is something we’ve begun doing with some frequency — our current lot of Nueva Llusta is another example we have identified — but we have been doing it with coffees like Concepción Huista for years because we a) benefit from having fresh offerings for our customers earlier than our competitors and b) are big enough to have control over shipments, which is something more difficult for very small companies that depend on importers’ timelines.

I mentioned above that we do a lot of cupping of this coffee for the sake of consistency. While it sometimes feels like a struggle to go through each days' lot and isolate the ones that taste prematurely faded, it’s a blessing in the context of where most farms and their buyers are, namely, blending coffee from the different days and crossing their fingers that it’s got more good than bad on balance. We buy some other coffees that are still at that stage (I’m not naming names) and the struggle is worth it for the flavors of the good lots. Speaking of flavor, I don’t expect anyone to be surprised by these coffees in comparison to their early harvest versions, because I think they’re pretty true to type. If you disagree, though, I hope, as always, to hear your thoughts and feedback.

Rollout Dates and Availability

We just began selling both of these lots and we expect to keep them in stock through the end of May or early June.
Recent Updates:
We celebrated the opening of our new Charleston, SC Training Center last weekend. The open house event featured brewing workshops, custom limited-edition giveaways designed by Fuzzco, whole-hog barbecue from The Pig Whistle (Chapel Hill, NC), gelato from Beardcat's Sweet Shop, and more. Thanks...
In the last post, I talked about why I think reporting is so important and what we have planned for the future of our own reporting. As I dived into planning for the upcoming 2014 Transparency Report with our coffee and marketing teams this week, I was asked a really important question by both...
A few weeks ago, I read an article about the purported end of the farm-to-table movement in the restaurant industry. According to the author, farm-to-table has been taken too far and restaurant-goers want to go back to ordering off of a menu without being “berated” by an extensive explanation of...
Expanding on the theme from my last post, I'd like to keep exploring the movement away from thinking about sustainability in coffee as a checklist of certifications and more as a process of movement along a continuum of continuous improvement. One aspect that's really appealing about the...
Over the duration of this series, I've talked a lot about "moving along the continuum" or "moving along the spectrum" in reference to how we think about sustainability. I'd like to dive into this idea a little deeper, because it applies to how we think about a lot of things Counter Culture—not just...