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Good afternoon and happy new year to all! I am really excited about the possibilities held by 2014 and we are starting the year off on a good foot with this week's single-farmer lots from Bartolo Concha and Nelson Melo.

I wouldn't blame you for calling these coffees microlots on Friday if that's a helpful term, but a few months back we made the decision to drop microlot as a marketing term because it's amorphous and subject to different definitions and qualifications even within a single company. We realized that more specific terms are better indicators for what makes a given coffee noteworthy, given that sometimes microlots denoted individual coffee farms within larger groups, sometimes coffee from one area of a large farm, sometimes coffee from a particular day of harvest, sometimes coffee of a single variety and so forth and so on.

Cup quality unites all of our microlots to some degree, of course, but even that gets tricky because a microlot of 500 pounds from a grower in Nicaragua might score 90 points and blow us away, whereas we expect our coffee from Idido in Ethiopia to score a couple points higher still and at 37,000 pounds, there's nothing micro about it.

Bartolo Concha and Nelson Melo are both members of associations of smallholder farmers we work with and these two individuals' coffees have been separated out, which makes them single-farmer lots. Make sense? Bartolo Concha is one of the seventy – some farmers whose coffee comprises our Valle del Santuario coffee. He has been a member of the co-op for as many years as we have been working with the five communities of the valley and coffee from his two farms, El Limón and El Cedro – named for lime and cedar trees growing on those parcels of land – has always met our minimum cupping score for purchase (an 85, for us), but this is the first year that we have selected it as a single-farmer lot.

The other single-farmer lot from Valle del Santuario, Moisés Vicente, has a similar story, and in fact, so does every other co-op member whose coffee we have selected to stand on its own in years past: they do well consistently but hit that highest-tier mark only once. When Hannah asked Bartolo at a meeting last month what he did differently this year to improve the quality of his coffee, he struggled to pinpoint anything unusual. This seems like a glitch in a system that was designed to both reward quality and to provide incentives for better agricultural practices, and it's one that we wouldn't be so aware of if it weren't for our survey of this co-op back in late 2011 and early 2012. You've all heard plenty about this research by now, but I'll include the link just for kicks.
 
Our research in Peru led to a stronger relationship and more trust with the growers of Valle del Santuario and the Cenfrocafe co-op, but it also left us with questions about why growers weren't achieving repeated success in Peru when we knew it was possible. Hannah and I decided to do a follow-up study focusing on the agricultural practices and behaviors most associated with repeat success and we took up that study with smallholder farmers in southern Colombia including, but not limited to, the members of the Orgánica association behind La Golondrina.

Arismendes Vargas, Gloria Tejada and Manuel Melenje are all members of that group who have received quality premiums multiple times over the years, but no farmer has produced microlots more consistently than Nelson Melo, and your faithful coffee buyers could not possibly be more tickled to have this grower's coffee to share with all of you after many years of knowing and admiring Nelson, his family and his leadership in the Orgánica association. Nelson's coffee has gone to another buyer since 2005 – predating our connection to Orgánica – and every year that we have tasted it, Nelson's coffee has been exceptional even among Orgánica's many laudable single-farmer lots. We have waited patiently for seven years and that patience paid off, but the tiny amount of this coffee we have will only be available to order online. Sales will begin later this month sometime, though I'm not sure quite when.
 
Enjoy, please, and as always, send your questions and feedback my way.

– Kim
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