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To pick up where I left off last week, I spent Friday in Jaen doing training at Cenfrocafe's new coffee shop in the morning, and yet again, I was impressed by a 100 percent Peruvian espresso blend and by the unabashed enthusiasm of the shop's baristas to learn more and improve their craft. In the afternoon, we cupped a bunch of samples in Cenfrocafe's lab with their crack team of cuppers. We were pretty calibrated last year, but it's always good to take advantage of opportunities to talk about coffee profiles and to taste other coffees from the other regions in which Cenfrocafe works. Of all the samples, my favorite was the one from San Ignacio, followed closely by the sample from Chirinos (Intelligentsia's producer partners). We build our lot from the coffee tendered to Cenfro in July and August, so the process is really just beginning.

Kim Elena with Santos Camizán García and his winning rooster.Saturday, I headed back to San Ignacio for a meeting with representatives of a program called Pro-Santuario that is working to strengthen conservation projects in the Santuario Nacional de Tabaconas-Namballe (the Santuario of our coffee's name). Their means to achieving these goals include building stable economies for the communities of the region and fulfilling basic gaps in infrastructure, because in the absence of stable economies and basic infrastructure (water) drive people to exploit the protected sanctuary for their survival. We strategized about how quality coffee can help foster healthy soil, plant diversity, and a culture of environmental sustainability. It's fair to say that our grower partners in Peru are pioneers in sustainable agriculture as they strive to grow great coffee in harmony with the natural environment but also commit themselves to conservation on a larger scale as stewards of the Santuario.

Drying coffee is a challenge in the misty climate of San Ignacio, Peru, even with the raised bed systems that Cenfro has helped the farmers construct.I spent the next two days in Alta Ihuamaca, the village that Peter and I visited in September. Sunday afternoon is the time of the week to see and be seen in the village, so after some time among the coffee plants in the morning, we spent the rest of the day between social visits and the weekly cockfight. I shared our photographs, coffee bios, and "Source" bags all over the communities, but in Alta Ihuamaca I had the pleasure of presenting one of our "Source" postcards to the grower who appears in the photo (his name is Silvio). He blushed and smiled, then commented that he wished he had shaved that day! As in the other communities I visited, the farms here look great: healthy, well-fertilized plants with lush, abundant shade. Drying coffee is a challenge in this misty climate, even with the raised bed systems that Cenfro has helped the farmers construct. We will focus some attention on this issue over the next couple of years in order to further overall crop quality.

Zacarías Neyra goes the extra mile to produce quality: varietals, harvesting ripe cherry, attention to detail in processing and constant farm improvement set him apart even in this field of great growers.One of the farms I revisited was that of Zacarías Neyra, one of our three microlot producers from last year. Like Aquino Huachez, Zacarías goes the extra mile to produce quality: varietals, harvesting ripe cherry, attention to detail in processing and constant farm improvement set him apart even in this field of great growers. Zacarías has made himself a leader and set an example for quality among the growers, and I expect that he'll continue to take on more responsibility within the co-operative as well as continuing to improve the quality of his crop. After dinner on Sunday, Zacarías and few other farmers and I stayed up late into the night discussing dream interpretation, witchcraft, and fate by candlelight. As I walked home night under the stars, I couldn't help feeling that this little valley is more than a little bit enchanted.

Leaving Alta Ihuamaca on Monday meant beginning the long, slow trip back to the States. I had one final meeting with Cenfrocafe on Tuesday to talk about project possibilities for the future, and today I'm back at Café Verde in Lima.

I miss you all and I look forward to seeing all of you soon! Until then, que les vaya bien.

abrazos,
Kim Elena

 

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