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Counter Culture Coffee, Peregrine Espresso, and Finca Mauritania collaborated on a groundbreaking pilot project to fight global climate change and protect the soil, water, and biodiversity of the Santa Ana, El Salvador-based coffee farm Finca Mauritania.
Since the beginning, Counter Culture has pursued coffee perfection by developing partnerships that ensure prosperity for all people, improving the natural environment, and operating efficiently to minimize our environmental impact – and we continue to make progress in all of these areas. Our Sustainability & Producer Relations Manager Kim Elena Bullock filed an update this week on how we're measuring our progress toward an increasingly sustainable business via proactive, supply-chain auditing.
 
 
Thanks,
Nathan
Counter Culture Coffee's Kim Elena Bullock in Colombia in 2009 at a then-new worm compost facility. In her trip report from Colombia last fall, Sustainability and Producer Relations Manager Kim Elena Bullock mentioned a new project to supply the growers of La Golondrina with more organic material for their small, certified organic coffee farms.

Kim recently received an update on the project from our partners in Popayan, and she filed an update in the DEVELOPMENT AT ORIGIN portion of our SUSTAINABILITY section.

Read Kim's update for exciting news about this sustainability development!

Thanks,
Nathan
As individuals, businesses, and policymakers begin to understand the impact of CO2 and the actions needed to counteract the effects of climate change, we see terms like carbon footprint and carbon neutral gain popularity. We also see that there are different ways to achieve carbon neutrality, e.g. reducing energy use, paying for renewable energy credits to replace the energy that we use from the conventional power grid, and planting trees to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere. Our path toward carbon neutrality begins by reducing our use of energy in all areas of our business, from the propane that we use to roast our coffee to the gasoline in our cars to the electricity that powers our computers and phones. In those areas where we cannot reduce our consumption of energy, we will look for alternative sources of energy. Our goal is to get as close to zero as possible, and then to purchase carbon offsets to account for the CO2 that we have not been able to eliminate from our products and processes. The more we reduce, the less we have to offset, which is good from both a fiscal-sustainability perspective and an environmental-sustainability perspective, as we humans can plant a finite number of trees.

Most people accept that the earth’s climate is changing as a result of human activities, in large part through the carbon dioxide released by the burning of fossil fuels.As we began to investigate our activities, we quickly realized that our footprint does not begin or end with Counter Culture Coffee’s activities. We value the interconnectedness of our coffee supply chains, from producers to consumers, and we work hard to communicate that we are all responsible to one another. If everything we do impacts everyone in the supply chain, how can Counter Culture Coffee be responsible only for the emissions of roasting coffee and for our staff’s energy use? What about the electricity our customers use to heat water for brewing in their shops? What about the fuel used to ship coffee from farms around the world to our doorstep? And what is the impact on the farm level?

Our coffee-producer partners live in some of the most ecologically important places in the world, and the biological diversity of their healthy farms assists in mitigating climate change. No other alternative crop—from corn to cattle—coexists in such a harmonious relationship with a diverse natural environment as coffee. Unfortunately, these beautiful and important places are also some of the places most threatened by the effects of climate change: rising temperatures, inconsistent rain patterns jeopardize the ability of these small farmers to make a living on coffee farms. It’s staggering to consider that our choices as a company here in the United States impact the very people on whom we depend for the product that makes our business possible. Scary as that might sound, the good news is that through these partnerships, we also have the ability to effect change ourselves and demonstrate the value of our beliefs and activities.

Seed to Cup Pilot Project

Aida Batlle is recognized throughout the coffee world as a pioneer in great coffee flavor development, and her coffee is sought after by roasters all over the world. Photo by Counter Culture Coffee.Leveraging our supply chain, we recently initiated a pilot project with a producer partner, Aida Batlle of Finca Mauritania in Santa Ana, El Salvador, and a customer, Peregrine Espresso in Washington, DC, to measure the carbon footprint of Finca Mauritania’s coffee from seed to cup. We are calculating the energy used at each step in the process, converting it to pounds of CO2 released into the atmosphere, and then planting trees with Aida in El Salvador to sequester the equivalent amount of carbon to what we produce in the processing, transportation, roasting, shipping, and brewing of her farm’s coffee. The tree planting initiative is directly funded by proceeds from the sale of Finca Mauritania coffee at Peregrine Espresso, so the program will plant a number of trees in proportion to the amount of coffee produced and consumed in this specific supply chain between farm, roaster, and café.

Click here for a press release about the pilot program.
“Peregrine Espresso is proud of our role in this project and invites our customers to join in this initiative to fight global climate change and create a more sustainable coffee trade,” said Peregrine manager Meredith Taylor. “Our hope is that $0.25 per cup and $1 per pound will not only make an impact on Aida's farm, but that this project will also help our customers to connect their coffee experience with the work farmers are doing at origin."

Aida Batlle, owner-operator of Finca Mauritania, stands out as one of coffee’s most innovative and passionate individuals, and coffee lovers in the U.S. have celebrated her dedication to growing the heirloom Bourbon coffee variety since Counter Culture began working with her in 2004. Aida has established Finca Mauritania as a model of sustainable agriculture and fair working conditions, and after three challenging years of transition, she successfully obtained organic certification for the farm in 2008. As Aida often remarks, her ability to produce great-tasting coffee depends on the health of her coffee plants, which in turn depends on the health of the natural environment.

“Everyone at Finca Mauritania is thrilled to be a part of this project, which will contribute to both the ecological health of our farm and the long-term quality and sustainability of our coffee,” said Batlle. “Uncompromising commitments to quality stewardship, sustainability, and transparency make Counter Culture Coffee and Peregrine Espresso ideal partners, and we look forward to building upon this exciting pilot project in the future.”

The tree-planting project is scheduled to begin in summer 2010 between Finca Mauritania’s next two coffee harvests. A diverse mixture of trees, including nitrogen fixers, lumber producers, and fruit trees will be selected for planting.

“Tree planting on coffee farms offers myriad ecological benefits, including slower maturation, sweeter fruit, reduction of fertilizer dependence, and the prevention of topsoil erosion,” said Counter Culture Coffee Sustainability & Producer Relations Manager Kim Elena Bullock. “In addition, tree trunks, branches, and canopies provide habitats for birds and other wildlife; and a tree can sequester 50 pounds of carbon per year, helping to counteract the effects of deforestation.”

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