You are here

Theme

Holiday Coffee

In accordance with our annual tradition, we have created a unique coffee in honor of the winter holiday season yet again this year. Today’s tasting we will be the first time that many of us get to try the 2014 iteration, and for fun, we’ve included the two single-origin coffees that comprise the blend in addition to the holiday coffee to encourage further flavor exploration. 

Notes on the Coffees

Holiday coffee is an interesting product. Looking at it one way, we could use almost any coffee and the product would still probably sell pretty well given that a) apparently coffee is a popular gift item, b) the word “holiday” is prominently displayed on the packaging, c) the packaging is especially nice, and d) it’s our company’s only consistent foray in the realm of “coffee for a cause,” which resonates with a different audience than our core customers. On the other hand, we want to use really delicious coffees as ingredients because we recognize that this will be many peoples’ first taste of Counter Culture Coffee and we want hook them on taste, story and everything else we do well.

This year’s holiday coffee combines two coffees from our favorite South American and African supplier cooperatives: Cenfrocafe of Jaén, Peru, and Yirgacheffe Coffee Farmer Cooperative Union (YCFCU) of Yirgacheffe, Ethiopia. Cenfrocafe’s coffee comes from a combination of producers from among their 2,400-and-counting members whose coffees stood out to the cooperative’s cuppers for being exceptionally clean and sweet. Although we don’t have the level of community specificity from this lot that we have from Valle del Santuario, the farms, elevation, and flavors are similar, and it’s coffees like this one that make Cenfrocafe our largest supplier from the Americas. Idido comes to us by way of YCFCU, from which coop we buy more coffee than from any other. Our holiday coffee from 2011 also came from YCFCU and, at the time, the Coffee Department talked about it as part of a campaign to popularize Ethiopian coffees. Three years later, coffees like Idido have made their way into more of our blends and year-round products over and they have and slowly but insistently shaped both flavor profiles and palates around their floral and citrusy characteristics.

Just as the packaging and ingredient philosophy of our holiday coffee continue to evolve every year, so does our goal with the per-pound donation. We have used holiday coffees to raise money for local charities, NGOs working in coffee-producing communities, and projects spearheaded by farms and cooperatives whose coffee we purchase, and the steady growth of our company has resulted in an ever-bigger pot of funds to donate. Growth is great, of course, but we’ve found that at times, the amount of money we raise can be overwhelming for the comparatively small-scale projects that our suppliers undertake, so we were looking for a way to break it up this year. Conveniently, CCC has a program called SEEDS that awards small grants of three to five thousand dollars to suppliers of ours, and since its creation in 2010 we’ve received applications from, and funded, producers across Latin America and East Africa as they planted trees, held compost trainings for their members, and developed strategies for income diversification. Instead of choosing a single project as the outlet for this year’s holiday fundraising, we’ll use the money to bulk increase the SEEDS budget by almost 50% and reach more growers across our diverse supply chains. Also, instead of limiting the donation opportunity to this one particular coffee and thereby sending the signal that the purchase of one does good and the purchase of the other… doesn’t… we opted to make the donation apply to any coffee purchased from CCC during the months of November and December. It’s less convenient to promote than one dollar per pound, but it’s worth the work of explaining because it’s a better representation of the holistic, measured approach we take to building relationships and buying coffee.

Rollout Dates and Availability

This year’s holiday coffee rolled out at the beginning of the month and we’ll sell it through the first week of January 2015.

–Kim Elena

Theme

Peru + Peru = PERU

Today we welcome Chirinos and Huabal—both from the Cenfrocafe cooperative, the same co-op that brings us Valle del Santuario and La Frontera coffees from Peru.


Notes on the Coffees

Cenfrocafe has long been a darling of the coffee department. They are forward thinking, have sound business practices (for the most part), ask the right questions about how to maintain the balance of quality and volume of coffees, and do their very best to put advice received from multiple sources into action.

With these coffees, we embark on the process of getting more-transparent coffees that hit higher quality marks from this important, historic partner. We hope that these coffees are just the beginning of increased volumes, transparency, and quality out of Peru.

Chirinos
Chirinos is known as the land of coffee and natural forests. Cedar, eucalyptus, and pine trees abound. They are also well known for some of the most beautiful waterfalls in the area. The coffee farms are broken up into three altitude groups, high, medium, and low.

Many of the farms in the mountains of the region have only been settled and planted for a generation, as opposed to the southern regions of Peru where the agricultural history dates back millennia. Cenfrocafe's members hail from some 30-odd communities around Jaén and smaller towns like San Ignacio, Chirinos, and Tabaconas.

Chirinos has 11 base organizations that deliver coffee to Cenfrocafe and 235 members total.

Look for: creamy, caramel, plum flavors

Huabal
Huabal (pronounced wa-BALL) is known as a higher altitude quality coffee growing zone. In addition to coffee, there are large areas of protected forest and unique wild animals that add to the biodiversity of the area. Their base organizations are located close to our long-term favorite Valle del Santuario in San Ignacio, Peru.

Huabal has 8 base organizations that deliver coffee to Cenfrocafe and 284 members total.

Look for: pronounced flavors of almond and green grape


Rollout Dates and Availability

Both coffees are already available for purchase as of this week. We will likely have Chirinos in house for about a month-and-a-half while Huabal will be closer to three months because we have a larger volume of this coffee.
Over the next two months, we will share stories about organizations doing exceptional work in coffee growing communities where we purchase. We often say that, while we know a lot about how coffee should taste and something about why it tastes the way it does, we know comparatively little about how best to support coffee farmers in their daily lives outside of coffee farming. Farmers might grow the best coffee in the world, but if they struggle to educate their children, put food on their tables, access health care, find clean water, or address other basic needs, our relationship—and by extension, our business model—is not sustainable.

Today, we will take a look at a non-profit we admire out of Burlington, VT, called Food 4 Farmers. Their mission is "to facilitate the implementation of sustainable food security programs in coffee-growing communities." In particular, they focus on collaborative work by emphasizing building local knowledge and capacity for individuals to solve their own problems by working through coffee cooperatives.

"Through a collaborative approach and partnerships, our goal is to transfer the tools and knowledge that coffee-farming families—and their communities—need for long-term food security," said Janice Nadworny, Co-Director of Food 4 Farmers. "One of the most exciting aspects of our work is witnessing this transformation from dependency to self-sufficiency."

The most eye-catching piece of their work to someone like me—who has been a part of and studied a number of non-profit and NGO models—is the following, in their own words:

"We don’t import a simplistic, one-size-fits-all model—we help communities identify locally appropriate solutions and strategies—and support them in managing their progress."

Though they are a fledgling non-profit, their small staff brings a range of experiences from the non-profit and academic world to the table. They are already well respected within and connected to the coffee industry with the likes of Rick Peyser (formerly of Keurig Green Mountain Coffee, currently working with Lutheran World Relief) on their board of directors.

Over the last four years, they have worked to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate food security strategies in Nicaragua, Mexico, Guatemala, and Colombia.

We are now in the second year of funding a food security project with Food 4 Farmers in Chiapas, Mexico, with CESMACH, a co-op that is part of Union el Triunfo. Food 4 Farmers is currently assessing the strengths and challenges of and resources available to the cooperative as they work to address seasonal hunger.

"Counter Culture has been a key partner in this work, stepping up to make the long-term investments necessary to help coffee-farming families thrive," Nadworny added.

To learn more about the great work Food 4 Farmers is doing click here.

More soon,
Hannah Popish

Theme

There's Only One Grand Reserve

Aida's Grand Reserve enters its ninth year, and, as always, it's at once a delicious coffee and great fodder for conversation about quality, relationships, and what makes a product special.

Style of Tasting

Cup and Brew

Tasters familiar with Aida's Grand Reserve will definitely want to cup it to get as much sensory information as possible, so begin by setting up the two coffees for cupping. Also be prepared to brew a batch or two of AGR to enjoy in at a more leisurely rate either as your cuppers are arriving or after you finish cupping—or both!

Notes on the Coffees

A few weeks ago, I said that Finca Mauritania is an example of how good a coffee can be with average elevation and good varieties when every step of the harvesting and processing of that coffee is flawless. Well, Aida's Grand Reserve, which we purchase from the same Aida Batlle who's responsible for Finca Mauritania's coffee, represents how much better a producer can make coffee when she has the option to complement coffee from better elevation and varieties with perfect processing.

Let me explain. Of the farms that Aida's family owns, Finca Mauritania is the lowest elevation and the only one that is 100% Bourbon variety, while her other farms—Los Alpes and Kilimanjaro—are higher up the Ilmantepec volcano and have more complex-tasting varieties like Kenia, Pacamara, and Typica.

Of course, Aida is not changing the varieties or elevation of coffee from an individual farm. But, unlike most farmers, she is able to apply the picking, processing, and selection techniques—the techniques that make Finca Mauritania so good—to varieties and elevation that are even better.

For most farmers, varieties are difficult to experiment with, because projects require at least five years to produce adequately and experimenting with elevation is impossible—unless you have money to spend on buying more land to farm and planting it with coffee, which, as you might expect, is rare.

Getting back to Grand Reserve, this is the ninth year that Aida has challenged herself to create a small lot of extraordinary coffee from among the many coffee varieties and methods of processing that she has available, and it's also our ninth year selling this coffee.

The idea began as a way to recoup costs from the damage caused by the 2005 eruption of the Ilmantepec volcano and has since become a coffee that Aida is incredibly proud of—over which she spends countless hours agonizing each year. Saying that every batch is unique is an understatement of comic proportions: A few years ago, there were no fewer than 27 different components to Aida's Grand Reserve coming from three farms, three processes (washed, sundried natural, and pulp natural), and three fermentation styles (Kenya, Ethiopia, and El Salvador) within the washed coffee segments.

The 2014 lot is simpler in its composition—which is exclusively washed coffees from Finca Kilimanjaro and Finca Los Alpes (i.e., no naturals, no Mauritania)—but the flavors don't lack for fruitiness or complexity. Though there are fewer components this year, Aida's Grand Reserve is by no means basic, as we're still talking about three varieties (Bourbon, Typica, and Kenia) from two farms and fermentation techniques borrowed from Burundi and Kenya.

Having tasted so many iterations of Aida's farms' coffees over the years, as well as the annual Grand Reserve lot, we have encouraged her to focus on the farms with the best elevation and varieties, as opposed to including all of the farms and all of the processes she knows—as she did in that year of the 27 components. I'm sure there's a sports or musical analogy to be made about demonstrating true mastery through refinement, as opposed to sheer volume, but, for this audience, Aida's coffees probably need no analogies in order to make sense.

Rollout Dates and Availability

Finca Mauritania is already on the menu and Aida's Grand Reserve is slated to roll out in mid-November, pending brand-spankin' new packaging.

–Kim Elena

Theme

Year Round Coffees: New bags / New names

 

Notes on the Coffees

As you’ve likely heard by now, on Monday, October 6, all our coffee will be in new packaging. We’d like to take a moment today to celebrate the packaging and taste our offerings that stay consistent throughout the year.

As our new packaging designs were coming together, we began to consider whether or not the rustic names of some of our year-round products would make sense in bright, modern-looking bags.

We put all of the year-round coffee names up for consideration. Rather than try to update them based upon existing names, we approached the daunting task from the perspective of how the names related to the coffees themselves. What they taste like. What we're trying to do with them from a buying perspective and so on.

Hologram (formerly Rustico) is a name we feel captures the spirit of the coffee: complex, dynamic, and vibrant.

Big Trouble (formerly Toscano) offers a bit of levity. Probably the most tongue-in-cheek thing we've done in a long time. It's a lark, of sorts. Not disingenuous, but playful. Easy to brew, challenging to source.

Fast Forward and Slow Motion (formerly Farmhouse and Decaf Farmhouse) continue to be companion pieces. Fast Forward lets us move quickly through new Latin American coffee offerings. While Slow Motion is about slowing down to enjoy a cup of coffee just because it's delicious.

46 (formerly No. 46) shows us that great coffees roasted dark can still be great: complex, sweet, clean and nuanced.

Apollo got to keep it’s name and with it we continue to get the opportunity to highlight Ethiopian coffees and what we love within them - floral, citrusy, bright notes.
 

Rollout Dates and Availability

Here’s the thing about year round coffees—you can always get them! The components or main coffee will change slightly throughout the year, but the flavor profile will remain steady. You can always find the detailed info on what’s in the bag either on our website or on the back of the bag!
As our new packaging designs were coming together, we began to consider whether or not the rustic names of some of our year-round products would make sense in bright, modern-looking bags.

We put all of the year-round coffee names up for consideration. Rather than try to update them based upon existing names, we approached the daunting task from the perspective of how the names related to the coffees themselves. What they taste like. What we're trying to do with them from a buying perspective and so on.

Hologram (formerly Rustico) is a name we feel captures the spirit of the coffee: complex, dynamic, light, and vibrant.

Big Trouble (formerly Toscano) offers a bit of levity. Probably the most tongue-in-cheek thing we've done in a long time. It's a lark, of sorts. Not disingenuous, but playful.

Fast Forward and Slow Motion (formerly Farmhouse and Decaf Farmhouse) continue to be companion pieces. Fast Forward lets us move quickly through new Latin American coffee offerings. While Slow Motion is about slowing down to enjoy a cup of coffee just because it's delicious.
 

If You're Looking For:


Toscano

Rustico

Farmhouse

Decaf Farmhouse
 

Theme

Kahawa Nzuri!

This week’s coffees are a paean to the flavors we cherish in the coffees we purchase from Kenya.

Style of Tasting

Cup + Brew

These coffees will be equally fun to cup and to brew, so I recommend following your cupping with a pour-over demonstration and brewing discussion. 

Notes on the Coffees

While the names of some of our coffees, like Thiriku, refer to both the name of the farmer co-operative society (FCS) and the washing station from which we purchase the eponymous coffee, Ngunguru is the name of one of three washing stations owned by the Tekangu FCS. Ngunguru and Thiriku hail from the Nyeri region, where we are accustomed to finding our best Kenyan coffees, but this past year, coffees from this region were more difficult to purchase than they previously had been due to the decision by the governor of Nyeri to centralize the sale of coffee in hopes of generating higher returns for farmers. We responded by diversifying our approach and although our coffees spent longer in transit than it has in past years, the coffees we sourced are still outstanding.

Thiriku is a favorite many times over for Counter Culture employees and customers alike, and the coffees we will sell from them this year certainly won’t disappoint. Out of all of the dozen-plus coffees in the shipment of Kenyan coffees that arrived in the warehouse two weeks ago, this lot of Thiriku is the most reminiscent of currant, hibiscus, and other sweet-savory-tangy flavors that have helped build Kenya’s reputation for coffee quality. Before I worked in coffee, I didn’t seek out jams, chutneys, sodas or anything else made from currants—much less the fresh fruits themselves—but after falling for Kenyan coffees, I now find myself gravitating toward them whenever I see them!

You all tasted spectacular coffee from Kambarari during our Pro Dev on Kenya a few months back, so I’m sure there’s no shortage of excitement to taste it again. In a recent Flickr set and report from Kenya, Tim wrote the following about this farm:

“There was one coffee this past year we could not stop talking about, and that was the coffee from Gerald Njagi Chege and his farm, Kambarari. We bought the coffee as soon as we tasted it, and actually flew it in from Kenya and sold it as our first ever single farmer Kenya lot. The sad news of this coffee, is when we visited the farm, we were told that Gerald has past away, and now his sons were managing the farm (I guess that peaberry lot we flew in, was a nice nod to Gerald).

"Kambarari is about 4 hectares of mostly SL28, but of all the farms I visited actually had the least infrastructure.  They ferment in a plastic bucket and wash in a wooden channel lined with a plastic tarp.”

This coffee represents one of our forays away from the model we’ve come to rely on in Kenya over the past five to ten years, which involves buying the top-scoring lots from FCSs in Nyeri that have been selected by the exporter Dorman, and toward working with slightly-larger-sized farms like Kambarari to build standalone relationships. We hope that by exploring beyond the known realm, we can find groups and individuals interested in undertaking projects together that allow us to work more closely and collaboratively with growers the way we’re accustomed to doing outside of Kenya. This particular farm is in Kiamutugu, to the east of Nyeri near Embu, and we have at least three more coffees from single farms for you to taste in the weeks to come!

Rollout Dates and Availability

Ngunguru has been on the menu for a while now, Thiriku just rolled out on Monday and we expect to begin selling Kambarari in mid-October, date TBD.

Theme

A country, a mountain, a saint

This week we’ll cup Finca Mauritania, Finca Kilimanjaro and St. Goret, which three coffees have in common that they’re all newly available for sale this week and tasting great.

Notes on the Coffees

Finca Mauritania is in top form this year with all the buttery sweetness you could want from a cup of coffee. All of Aida Batlle’s farms in Santa Ana, El Salvador suffered during 2013’s outbreak of coffee leaf rust and Mauritania, which sits lower on the mountain than Kilimanjaro and Los Alpes and tends to be the most productive of the three farms, lost the highest percentage of its total production. Though Aida decided to sacrifice her organic certification to mitigate the effects of rust, our relationship with her remains strong and we are excited to celebrate ten years of buying coffee from Finca Mauritania this year! Also, since this coffee arrived a week and a half ago, it’s been really interesting to taste Finca Mauritania next to other coffees from similar geographies across Central America. Increasingly across Latin America, older trees at 1,400 meters have been replaced by rust-resistant varieties like Catimor and the quality of the coffee has plummeted accordingly, to the point that we almost always end up blending with the coffees we do purchase from these elevations. Not so with Mauritania, where Aida has stuck with the bourbon variety, continued picking perfectly ripe coffee and processing it meticulously to remind us of how a farmer’s choices realize the potential of the coffee plant.

While the bourbon variety at Finca Mauritania is super sweet, it can’t hold a candle to the complexity of the variety planted higher up the Ilamatepec volcano at the Batlle’s Finca Kilimanjaro. Colloquially called “kenia” in El Salvador, the appearance—or morphology, for you word nerds—of the coffee plants at Finca Kilimanjaro is reminiscent of the SL varieties that have made Kenyan coffee famous. Since this coffee won El Salvador’s Cup of Excellence competition in 2003, it has been sold to a select few roasting companies around the world and we have slowly but surely managed to secure a larger percentage of Kilimanjaro’s coffee every year. I always look forward to its arrival and this year’s wine-like profile doesn’t disappoint.

Another place we find SL-28 and SL-34 varieties growing is in Uganda, a country which is better-known for producing low-quality robusta than the stellar flavors we associate with neighboring Kenya. We’ve spent the past two years getting to know the Bukonzo Joint Co-operative of the Kasese district in western Uganda and this year we’re thrilled to feature coffee from the farmer co-op of St. Goret, named for the parish in which it’s located, as a single-origin offering. The elevation of St. Goret is comparable to Finca Mauritania, and in addition to the SL varieties I mentioned, they also grow Nyasaland, which is the Ugandan term for its oldest coffee, which was brought to the country in 1903 from Malawi—known as Nyasaland back in the colonial days. I’ll be curious to hear what similarities you taste between St. Goret and Kilimanjaro that might be attributable to variety, because their prototypical descriptors tend to sit near one another on the flavor wheel.

Over the past five years, as our approach to buying coffee has evolved, we have differentiated ourselves from many of our peers in the specialty coffee industry through our ability to recognize potential and contribute to its development. In quality terms, that means exploring geographies with good varieties and elevation, sometimes in lesser-known countries of origin, and in relationship terms, that means finding small producers on the fringes of the quality market and building trust over time. When we started buying from Aida in 2004, we were just beginning to figure out what made great coffees great, and over the past decade, we’ve learned invaluable lessons about the significance of varieties, picking and processing through experiments done by Aida and other market-savvy, globally-connected coffee producers like her. As we’ve figured out what to look for and how to make good coffee better, we’ve been able to use what we’ve learned to enter into relationships in places like Uganda with marginalized smallholder farmers with clear goals and the knowledge of how to succeed. It’s been a heck of a journey so far and I can’t wait to see where we go next.

Rollout Dates and Availability

All three coffees rolled out on Friday, September 5, and I hope to assuage any potential concerns about the speed at which we have been known to sell Finca Kilimanjaro’s coffee by telling you we have more of this coffee than we’ve ever had, so it should last longer than a few weeks.

Pages