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This spring, Counter Culture embarked on an exciting new partnership with six students and a professor at Duke's Nicholas School for the Environment. After discussing research questions casually with Professor Shapiro-Garza for a couple of months, we decided to go all in and work jointly on a master's project that will explore resiliency and issues facing smallholder coffee farmers as they adapt to climate change.

The students have been gearing up for the fieldwork segment of the project which will involve spending time in Colombia, Guatemala, and Peru. In preparation for the fieldwork, the students visited our roastery, co-designed survey tools that will be used to interview people at different levels: from individual households to the farmer cooperative, to key stakeholders in the communities and regions. They have also done literature reviews to help them understand the (admittedly massive) scope of this issue. In addition, Professor Shapiro-Garza and I had extensive conversations with coffee industry actors including certification agency Rainforest Alliance and social lender Root Capital.

We couldn't be more excited to follow along on their journey—which starts right now—and we'd like to invite you to follow along, as well: Facebook and Twitter. We will also periodically post blog entries on our website.

Photo: (left to right) Joanna Furguiele, Brenda Lara, Saira Haider, Martín Ramírez, Mike Younis, and Claire Fox. (Photo credit: Professor Shapiro-Garza).

All the best,
Hannah

 

Jonathan Bonchak at teh 2014 US Brewers Cup.Congratulations to 2014 US Barista Champ Laila Ghambari of Cherry Street Coffee House and to 2014 US Brewers Cup champion Todd Goldsworthy of Klatch Coffee. Both advance to the world coffee competitions in Rimini, Italy, June 10–12.

We're proud of all of the hard-working, super-talented coffee professionals from around the country—including our very own 2014 regional winners—who competed in the 2014 US Brewers Cup and Barista competitions in Seattle.

Mid-Atlantic sales rep Jonathan Bonchak—who won the 2014 Southeast Regional Brewers Cup Championship (SEBrC) for the second year in a row—was a finalist in the US Brewers Cup again this year and took fifth place. Great job, Jonathan!

J. Park Brannen—a customer rep from Team NYC—won the Northeast Regional Barista Championship (NERBC) with a polished presentation competed in the US Barista Championship in Seattle with a very strong showing. Great job, Park!

In addition to our inspiring co-workers who did an amazing job in Seattle, a handful of dedicated professionals from our wholesale partners competed ably, as well. 
 

Erika Vonie of Ultimo Coffee in Philadelphia—who took second place in the NERBC in January with coffee from our Tairora Project from the Eastern Highlands, Papua New Guinea—used this coffee again in Seattle. Corey Reilly from Everyman Espresso in New York finished third in the NERBC and competed again in Seattle, as well.

In the Southeast Regional Barista Competition (SERBC), independent barista Dawn Shanks from Peregrine Espresso in Washington, DC, used Counter Culture's Biloya Natural Sundried to earn a third place finish. Dawn competed in Seattle with Idido Natural Sundried. Tim Jones of Jubala Village Coffee in Raleigh came in fourth in the SERBC using a blend of Idido washed and Biloya Natural Sundried, which he used again in the national competition. And, Nathan Nerswick of 5&10 in Athens, GA, rounded out the SERBC finalists in sixth place. Nathan brewed our Baroida coffee—also from the Eastern Highlands, Papua New Guinea—when he competed in Seattle.

Thanks to all of you for your hard work!


 

Our Coffee Taster's Flavor Wheel is intended to be an easy tool to help people use the same, everyday language to talk about coffee.Writer Leslie Jospeshs recently spoke with Coffee Buyer and Quality Manager Tim Hill about the Counter Culture Coffee Taster's Flavor Wheel for the Wall Street Journal.

Tim and our coffee department conceived of their update as a means to make a more approachable version of the ubiquitous and genre-defining Specialty Coffee Association of America flavor wheel—which set the standard decades ago for the industry—by using language from their everyday cupping lives.

The wheel is intended to be dynamic and collaborative, as Tim noted when talking with Ms. Josephs, "We want to update it every year, and we also want to translate it ourselves into four languages and change the descriptors so that they are culturally relevant to each country."

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They ain’t what they Llusta be

These coffees should taste familiar, but pay attention! Take notes! Today’s tasting is the last hurrah for Toscano as portrayed by Nueva Llusta from Bolivia and Haru in the role of Apollo. Just Wednesday we began roasting and selling new versions of these well-loved coffees: the Toscano shipping now is comprised of a just-arrived lot from Union El Triunfo in Chiapas, Mexico and Apollo of Suke Quto from Sidamo, Ethiopia.

Notes on the Coffees

I get excited about new iterations of products like Toscano and Apollo because change typically means fresher components (not to mention that I love adventure of all sorts, including of flavor). In Toscano’s case, though, I will admit to feeling a twinge of wistfulness today because Toscano (NL) has been so loved and appreciated in this current form, which is especially interesting given how bright it is and how seldom we think of Toscano for brightness. That said, we bought Union El Triunfo’s coffee last year thinking it would taste good in Toscano and it did, and I’m glad to have it back this year for Toscano. This is one of the strongest co-ops in Chiapas from social and environmental perspectives, and they have great cup quality potential, too.

Haru has held steady in its role as Apollo for many months and if we had more of it to sell, I’d feel comfortable continuing to do so, given how well it and Idido have held up. Alas, we finally reached the end of last year’s Haru and this year’s lots are somewhere between Yirgacheffe and Durham, so we went looking for alternatives and found Suke Quto. Suke Quto is a delicious organic coffee from Sidamo, Ethiopia that shipped early, and that is pretty much all we know about it. We are eagerly awaiting our coffees from our long-time supplier co-ops within the YCFCU but meanwhile, Apollo’s citrusy, floral flavor profile makes it hard to substitute coffees from other parts of the world.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see the same (but are they the same?) coffees on the table next week or the one to follow, so as I said, take notes!

Rollout Dates and Availability

These lots rolled over Wednesday, April 16, and we should be working our way through them over the next month to two months.
Attention Coffee Professionals: Please join us for our new Pro Dev series on Wednesday, April 30, at 3:00 p.m., at any of our Training Centers for a survey discussion of what is currently huge news regarding systematic changes to the coffee market in Nyeri, Kenya. Despite the relative radio silence about the origin in U.S. news, big things are brewing in the land of our beloved SL-28.

We'll talk about the situation; what it means for the future of Counter Culture favorites like Thiriku, Kangocho, and other lots from Nyeri; and taste some of the fruits of Timothy Hill's recent experimentation, labor, and new-relationship building in other regions of the country.

Counter Culture Regional Training Centers host monthly Pro Dev sessions the last Wednesday of the month. Free and open to all coffee professionals.

These events, which are free and open to all coffee professionals, focus on peer-to-peer professional education, palate development, and exploration into some of the most interesting and relevant topics in specialty coffee. They're a chance for coffee professionals to grow their skills and knowledge together in a noncompetitive, open environment, and to build conversations around the issues that matter most to the industry at large.

Nuova SimonelliTogether with the crew from Nuova Simonelli, four-time Irish Barista Champion Colin Harmon will introduce, demonstrate, and discuss the brand-new Mythos One espresso grinder, with Clima Pro technology. Is this grinder the future of espresso?Does temperature in grinding really make a difference? How quiet can a commercial-grade coffee grinder be?

Join us for coffee, conversation, and light refreshments on Tuesday, April 22, at 3:00 pm, at our New York Training Center and hear what Colin has to say about this new barista tool.

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Toscano Times Two


Ta da! Today, two Toscanos tickle your tastebuds! Each bag represents a different incarnation of Toscano, with the bag labeled Ecuador representing the most recent recipe we have been selling and the bag labeled Costa Rica the version that becomes available today (and by today I mean today, Thursday, March 20th).

Notes on the Coffees

Toscano Ecuador

The coffee that we had contracted for 2013 from the Fapecafes co-operative of Loja, Ecuador and which we were planning to sell as El Gavilán lacked the brightness and sweetness we expect from that coffee. While we opted not to feature the coffee as a straight, seasonal offering, we suspected it would taste good in Toscano. We also knew that the co-op’s members were struggling with coffee leaf rust and would be hard pressed to find another buyer for this coffee that didn’t meet CCC’s high standard but was still a far cry from average in value or quality. So we sacrificed our hopes for El Gavilán this year and bought coffee for Toscano and some really-great-but-really-small single-farmer lots.

Toscano Costa Rica

Between 2008, which was the last year in which we sold Cerro del Fuego (old-timers, you know what I’m talking about), and today your coffee department has tasted dozens of coffees from Costa Rica but declined to purchase any of them. Though some of these coffees have been delicious, they have also cost significantly more than coffees of comparable quality from elsewhere in the Americas, and the price-to-quality relationship tends to be especially skewed with organic coffees. In short, they haven’t been a good fit. So what makes today’s coffee different? The Costa Rican coffee that we will be using for Toscano for the next few weeks comes from six small estates (today’s is Linda Vista) located near the farm of a fellow named Tim O’Brien. We were introduced to Tim a few years ago as an employee of an importer we do business with and he is now building his own importing business. He’s excited and motivated to do good work for CCC, so we bought the best coffees he was offering from the 2012/2013 harvest both in order to get our relationship with him started on a good foot and to continue pushing to get better, sweeter coffees into Toscano. All of these coffees were dried with a focus on water activity and low moisture, which has helped their stability, and I think you’ll like the way they taste. 

Rollout Dates and Availability

We just began selling Toscano (Costa Rica) today and we will probably only have it for two weeks or so before we move into another coffee. What coffee, you ask? Well, it depends on what arrives and tastes right in these next two weeks. Never a dull moment here in the coffee department.


A crew from Counter Culture went to Chico, CA, for Sierra Nevada's Beer Camp in February: company president Brett Smith, Head Roaster Jeff McArthur, and Coffee Buyer & Quality Manager Tim Hill.

Counter Culture's beer team collaborated with our friends and neighbors at All About Beer Magazine—in anticipation of their 35th anniversary later this year—to brew a coffee-infused beer with Sierra Nevada as part of the brewery’s Beer Camp program.

Cold-brewed Haru coffee from Yirgacheffe, Ethiopia, was added to an India pale ale brewed using hops that would impart tropical fruit flavors—Mosaic, Calypso, and an experimental hop currently known as 291. (This last one sounds a bit like SL-28 in name.)

Thanks to All About Beer and Sierra Nevada for having us. Check out All About Beer's video from the trip and stay tuned for more information on this over the next few months.

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