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NOTE We will not be hosting a weekly tasting on Friday, January 23, at any of our regional Training Centers. We will return to our regular schedule the following week. Thanks!

We're very (very) softly launching a next Limited-Release Blend (think Holiday Coffee + last summer's Equilibrium) in a few weeks and will be tasting the blend and its components this week at our training centers.A preview of Underdog, our next limited-release blend

Style of Tasting:
Cup the four components, then brew the blend.

Notes on the Coffees: 
I don’t know about you, but I root for the underdog in sports and in life almost exclusively.

Of course, in terms of coffee, like most of you, I love coffees from Ethiopia, Kenya, Colombia, Guatemala, and a host of other countries that hundreds of roasters—including us—carry amazing lots from every year. But when a coffee comes great in from a place that I don't see a lot of other roasters focusing on—or from a producer or place that in the past hasn’t had quite the best coffee—that's when I really celebrate.

This year, the Colbran family in Papua New Guinea delivered the best, most consistent harvest they have ever had—in one of the most difficult years they've had producing coffee—and that's why Tairora became the base for this blend.

Until recently, no one in the specialty industry carried coffee from Burundi. Two years in a row, Mpemba has made a pristinely sweet coffee that is my personal pick on the offerings right now.

East Timor wasn’t even close to being on our radar this year, but, when we starting tasting the coffee from Haupu and Lacau, we were hooked. And now we can't wait to keep exploring how good these coffees can get. (There is certainly a lot of work to get them as good as we think they can be.)

Last but not least: Buziraguhindwa Natural Sundried from Burundi. This is simply the best-prepared natural sundried coffee we have ever seen from a country that, until we bought this coffee last year, never produced this type of coffee—and now other producers in Burundi are imitating this style of processing.

Of course, we are proud of every coffee we source, but these four coffees represent the ones we've had to maintain the most patience with and commitment for, the ones that have surprised us the most, and the ones that might not have the odds in their favor but have come from behind to steal the show.

Give the coffee lover in your life a lifetime’s worth of better brewing by registering them for a Counter Intelligence coffee course with us at one of our Counter Culture Coffee regional training centers!

We offer many different professional-level classes—from coffee brewing and tasting, to espresso, and even about the origins and training of coffee. Each course is a dynamic mix of coffee theory, tasting, and hands-on experience preparing or comparing coffee in a variety of contexts. Check our course catalogue for more detailed information about our offerings.

While we don’t currently offer vouchers or gift certificates for our courses, you're welcome to reserve a seat in any of our posted classes in advance—check our updated course calendar for dates and availability. Simply register and pay for the course using your own name and e-mail address to keep the gift a secret, and we’ll happily substitute your loved one’s name and contact information after you reveal the present, so they can receive any additional future e-mails or information about the class! 

(If the class you select doesn’t work with your loved one’s schedule, no problem! As long as the space is canceled at least 48 hours before the class start time, you’ll automatically receive a full refund.)

Feel free to email with any questions, and Happy Brew Year!


Competition Is None

The Big Eastern competition opens on Friday and for this week’s tasting we’ve chosen three coffees that have appeared in the routines of competitors in barista and brewer’s cup competitions at the regional and national levels over the past two years.

Notes on the Coffees

After making its competition debut as part of Jonathan Bonchak’s routine for the US Brewer’s Cup in Seattle in April of 2014, Olke Birre’s coffee is the choice of multiple competitors in both brewing and espresso realms this weekend. In blind cuppings of our many Ethiopian coffees, Olke’s coffee consistently takes the top spot for its balance of floral aromatics and clear-as-a-bell citric acidity. In addition to possessing one of the most perfect flavor profiles we can imagine, this coffee’s appeal is compounded by the fact that it hails from a single farmer and that we know him personally, which is unusual in Ethiopia. Plus, as I’ve told you many times before, he is a head taller than most farmers and was wearing a gold medal when we first met him, so he made quite an impression.

Next up is Ngunguru, one of our current offerings from the flavor capital of the coffee world, Kenya. In the spirit of full transparency, I’ll admit that I meant to send Thiriku, on the wings of which Lem Butler soared to victory in the Southeast Barista Championship in 2012, but ended up typing Ngunguru, instead. Oops. But never you mind, for this coffee’s complexity is equal or superior to that of pretty much any other coffee you could imagine. It’s precisely that complexity—the combination of brightness, mouth-watering savory notes, and brothy body—that make Kenyan attractive for competition settings where unique tastes, memorable descriptors, and creative flavor pairings win points.

Papua New Guinea’s Tairora rounds out the lineup with juicy flavors that are reminiscent of today’s other two coffees, but with a fuller body and more notes of nut and sweet spice than we usually find in East African coffee. Erika Lee Vonie, now at Everyman Espresso, took Tairora to the national stage in April of this year and combined it with herbs and fresh cucumber for a delicious signature beverage. Of today’s three coffees, Tairora was harvested most recently, and, after two years of struggling with both shipping delays and inconsistent quality, it arrived early and is tasting great. We are very thankful to have found the Colbran family and their coffee farm, Baroida, four years ago, and Tairora, which comes from smaller farms around Baroida, demonstrates the mostly unrealized quality potential of these highlands.

Rollout Dates and Availability

All three coffees are available now, but Olke Birre’s time is running out, so savor these last sips. Ngunguru will be around through December, at least, and we hope Tairora will last through March, though it's selling like hotcakes, so I’m not making any promises. 

-Kim Elena


There's Only One Grand Reserve

Aida's Grand Reserve enters its ninth year, and, as always, it's at once a delicious coffee and great fodder for conversation about quality, relationships, and what makes a product special.

Style of Tasting

Cup and Brew

Tasters familiar with Aida's Grand Reserve will definitely want to cup it to get as much sensory information as possible, so begin by setting up the two coffees for cupping. Also be prepared to brew a batch or two of AGR to enjoy in at a more leisurely rate either as your cuppers are arriving or after you finish cupping—or both!

Notes on the Coffees

A few weeks ago, I said that Finca Mauritania is an example of how good a coffee can be with average elevation and good varieties when every step of the harvesting and processing of that coffee is flawless. Well, Aida's Grand Reserve, which we purchase from the same Aida Batlle who's responsible for Finca Mauritania's coffee, represents how much better a producer can make coffee when she has the option to complement coffee from better elevation and varieties with perfect processing.

Let me explain. Of the farms that Aida's family owns, Finca Mauritania is the lowest elevation and the only one that is 100% Bourbon variety, while her other farms—Los Alpes and Kilimanjaro—are higher up the Ilmantepec volcano and have more complex-tasting varieties like Kenia, Pacamara, and Typica.

Of course, Aida is not changing the varieties or elevation of coffee from an individual farm. But, unlike most farmers, she is able to apply the picking, processing, and selection techniques—the techniques that make Finca Mauritania so good—to varieties and elevation that are even better.

For most farmers, varieties are difficult to experiment with, because projects require at least five years to produce adequately and experimenting with elevation is impossible—unless you have money to spend on buying more land to farm and planting it with coffee, which, as you might expect, is rare.

Getting back to Grand Reserve, this is the ninth year that Aida has challenged herself to create a small lot of extraordinary coffee from among the many coffee varieties and methods of processing that she has available, and it's also our ninth year selling this coffee.

The idea began as a way to recoup costs from the damage caused by the 2005 eruption of the Ilmantepec volcano and has since become a coffee that Aida is incredibly proud of—over which she spends countless hours agonizing each year. Saying that every batch is unique is an understatement of comic proportions: A few years ago, there were no fewer than 27 different components to Aida's Grand Reserve coming from three farms, three processes (washed, sundried natural, and pulp natural), and three fermentation styles (Kenya, Ethiopia, and El Salvador) within the washed coffee segments.

The 2014 lot is simpler in its composition—which is exclusively washed coffees from Finca Kilimanjaro and Finca Los Alpes (i.e., no naturals, no Mauritania)—but the flavors don't lack for fruitiness or complexity. Though there are fewer components this year, Aida's Grand Reserve is by no means basic, as we're still talking about three varieties (Bourbon, Typica, and Kenia) from two farms and fermentation techniques borrowed from Burundi and Kenya.

Having tasted so many iterations of Aida's farms' coffees over the years, as well as the annual Grand Reserve lot, we have encouraged her to focus on the farms with the best elevation and varieties, as opposed to including all of the farms and all of the processes she knows—as she did in that year of the 27 components. I'm sure there's a sports or musical analogy to be made about demonstrating true mastery through refinement, as opposed to sheer volume, but, for this audience, Aida's coffees probably need no analogies in order to make sense.

Rollout Dates and Availability

Finca Mauritania is already on the menu and Aida's Grand Reserve is slated to roll out in mid-November, pending brand-spankin' new packaging.

–Kim Elena

Chris Colbran of Baroida in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea.Theme

Kudos to the Colbrans

This week, we’ll taste and celebrate the first roasts of this year’s Baroida and Tairora from the Eastern Highlands region of Papua New Guinea.

Style of Tasting

Brew Two

As we only have two coffees and they come from the same place, I suggest brewing them both through paper and putting the emphasis on the farm and the freshness of these two lots, as opposed to the cupping ritual.

Notes on the Coffees

Papua New Guinea is a long way from Durham, NC, and, until we started buying coffee from the Colbran family four years ago, Counter Culture hadn’t had a relationship there last more than a year or two. We persisted in trying to find a foothold there because the geography, climate, and varieties are all excellent, and we knew the coffees could be excellent, too.

With that history in mind, we feel extra appreciation for the relationship that we have built with Chris Colbran and his family since 2010—which was the first year they ventured into marketing their coffee directly to buyers instead of selling it to an exporter to blend. The coffee we purchase from their farm, Baroida, and the surrounding Tairora tribe are consistently great and only getting better as the family continues to refine their work.

Though they come from similar geography and varieties, Baroida has typically been more savory and fuller in body than Tairora, which seems true again this year. It’s early yet, though, and this is our first tasting, so please do share your feedback and questions now and as we continue to taste this coffee in the months to come.

Rollout Dates and Availability

Baroida and Tairora roll out on Monday and, between this first container and the late-harvest lots that will arrive in a month or so, we have a good volume of both. Thank goodness for that, too, because we count on these coffees to get us through the dark days of winter and into the springtime, when we begin to anticipate the return of coffees from the northern hemisphere.

We are compelled – driven, some have said – by a commitment to creating cutting-edge coffee people and a dedication to real social, environmental, and fiscal sustainability.

We're hiring for a Customer Relations Representative in New York. Please email a resume and cover letter to apply.

We're also hiring for a Coffee Technician in New York. Please email a resume and cover letter to apply.

We're also hiring for a Network Administrator in Durham, NC. Please email a resume and cover letter to apply.


Deconstructing the blend – Part 1 of 2

In years past, we have worked hard to transition many of our "blends" to become flavor profiles that can then be best served by one single-origin coffee, two if push comes to shove. Our rationale has been twofold: one, make transparency easier—there's no hiding the coffee when it's the only single-origin—and two, by necessity, intentionally trying to move through coffee within a timely fashion to maintain freshness. But, we know that combining coffees together for flavor purposes is not inherently a bad thing.

On Monday, we will be introducing a new type of blend. The debut incarnation is called Equilibrium! The underlying idea here is that we don't really think of it as a blend, at all. Rather, Equilibrium is three of the most delicious coffees available to us in summer and early fall, and they somehow become even more delicious, bright, and complex when combined together.

Style of Tasting: Cup the Components

This week, as a precursor to the arrival of Equilibrium, we will taste each of the parts that make up the whole. We'll suggest cupping the three side by side to showcase what each brings to the table. You may then decide to brew or do whatever else you like with the crowd favorite.

While tasting, encourage people to think about what the three coffees might taste like together. As a teaser, let them know if they come back to the tasting next week, we'll delve more into the philosophy and future of coffees like Equilibrium.

Notes on the Coffees:

As a nod to its name, Equilibrium is made up of equal parts of three coffees that are already known to us, the first two, Idido and Concepción Huista, more so than the third, Ngunguru, which, of course, just graced our roasters for the first time this past week.

33% Idido, Yirgacheffe, Ethiopia
This first lot from the Idido cooperative in Yirgacheffe, Ethiopia, represents a select group of 200 of the most dedicated farmers. These farmers turn in their best cherry at the peak of harvest for this washed special preparation coffee. Notes of melon, orange blossom, and citrus.

33% Concepción Huista, Huehuetenango, Guatemala
One of the most highly anticipated Central American coffees we offer, Concepción Huista delivers yet again. This year, our fourth year working with the cooperative, we continued to focus on buying smaller lots in addition to volume—trying to capture higher quality from particular areas within the cooperative. Look for softer flavors of creamy caramel and sweet plum.

33% Ngunguru, Nyeri, Kenya
Ngunguru is one of three members of the Tekangu cooperative society. When we went looking for great Nyeri coffee this year, we knew we had to share Ngunguru's coffee with you. Lush, complex notes of raisin and sweet savoriness abound.


Equilibrium will be available with all of its brightness and juiciness on Friday, July 18. We anticipate it will stick around through September or October, but it's a new item so why not try it at its debut in case it disappears quickly!



Our new pourover iced coffee video is short and sweet and easy to use. This (phone-friendly) tutorial breaks down the simple steps for delicious pourover iced coffee into a quick lesson that anyone can use and enjoy.

We've gone on record (once or twice) as really loving this method for iced coffee. The results of brewing directly onto ice are a bright, vibrant expression of the coffee that is incredibly refreshing.

To celebrate both the new video and this month's Featured Coffee, Idido (which happens to be perfect for brewing over ice), our #AnyCoffeeAnyBrew Instagram contest for July focuses on ... iced coffee. No matter how you make it, post a photo of whatever coffee you're drinking iced on Instagram and tag #AnyCoffeeAnyBrew for a chance to win our weekly prize of a bag of our July Featured Coffee, Idido!

The video was shot at our Durham HQ by Graphic Designer Christy Baugh—with set design/production assistance from her fellow designer Katie Parland—with Tech Manager Bryan Duggan as the "lead actor." (Web Content Manager Cameron Gatling makes a cameo at the end as "coffee drinker #2.") Music for the video was written and recorded by Production Associate Thomas Costello.