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Training Centers

 

Counter Culture's regional training centers are living embodiments of coffee culture within various, diverse communities. They are designed to encourage and facilitate professional development in a welcoming and distraction-free environment.

Unique spaces for work and play, regional training centers are designed for learning about coffee and building relationships. Training centers serve as home base not only for Counter Culture employees and instructors, but also for coffee professionals and enthusiasts within the nearby communities.

Dedicated resources are available for learning, practice, and guided experimentation at no additional cost to Counter Culture's exclusive wholesale accounts.

Our Tastings at Ten series–held on Fridays at 10 a.m. at all of our Regional Training Centers–are free and open to the public.

There will be no Tasting at Ten on Friday, April 29 at any of our Training Center locations. We are at our annual company meeting and celebrating the launch of our new headquarters in Durham." Please join us at all locations on Friday, May 6 at 10 a.m.

Related Updates:
Sustainability Manager Meredith Taylor visited East Timor last month. It was the first time anyone from Counter Culture has visited the country. Since 2002, coffee has been a major export for East Timor, and Meredith was excited for the opportunity to check out this under-the-radar origin. Read...
As I've said in previous posts, we have some awesome employees here at Counter Culture who think about sustainability not only at work, but in their own lives, as well. One of these sustainably-minded folks is Chelsea Thoumsin, the customer support representative at our Philadelphia Training Center...
March 13–19, 2016 On this weeklong trip, students participate in each step of the coffee production process at origin—from harvest to export—and learn about the benefits and challenges of building long-term coffee relationships. The 2016 Origin Field Lab will cover the complexities of...
In this post, I'm going to shift away from talking about sustainability where we buy coffee and focus on our own operations as a roaster. A coffee grown sustainably shouldn't necessarily retain that "sustainable" designation if others involved further along the supply chain aren't also acting...
In this post, I'd like to dive in to what I mentioned in the first post as a good indicator of a coffee's sustainability: certifications. Wouldn't it be great if there were a certification and corresponding label that could simply tell us whether a coffee is sustainable or not? The good news is...