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Coffee Seasonality

Coffee is at its best when treated like fresh produce. Understanding coffee as produce lets us think of it as a freshly crafted food, with all the deliciousness that brings.

The excitement of a new crop of coffee is one of the best parts of working in the coffee industry. But, as months go by, flavors fade, and the coffee loses its unique characteristics, becoming more and more ordinary. Luckily, by then, the seasons will have changed, and there will be new harvests of new coffees to explore and enjoy.

Click here for a list of projected offerings and estimated Seasonal Availability.

Processing & Export
Arrive in US
Roasting Begins
Roasting & Harvesting*
*Roasting & Harvesting: Countries with two harvests per year can be in two different stages during the same month. For example, Colombia in November can be beginning to harvest their Mitaca harvest (mid-year), while we begin to roast their first harvest.

Please note that this map provides a general harvest calendar for each country based on many years of purchasing. There can be significant variation in the harvest, processing, and arrival of coffee. The size of the farm or cooperative, available infrastructure in the producing country, volume harvested, and environmental factors can impact when Counter Culture receives a specific coffee and when it is sold.

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