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Espresso Fundamentals

 
Espresso Fundamentals
Espresso Fundamentals introduces the necessary ingredients for quality espresso and espresso-based drinks. Students will learn about basic principles and required equipment; and practice preparing, tasting, and evaluating espresso and milk. Information is presented in short lectures and reinforced by hands-on training. Participants can expect to work individually with instructors and in small groups developing espresso and milk skills, including espresso dosing and distribution, tamping technique, grind adjustment, milk texturing, beverage preparation, equipment cleaning and upkeep, and more.

Participants should expect to taste both coffee and milk.

Ideal for new baristas or as a refresher course for baristas with experience, Espresso Fundamentals attendance is required prior to registering for Intermediate Espresso: Tasting and Technique, and Milk Mechanics. (This lab replaces the Beginner Espresso Lab in the Counter Intelligence curriculum.)

Prerequisites: None

Full day lab: $250

Click here to view our full course schedule and register online.

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